Day 6: Prompt- Hero(ine) Ballad Anaphora/Epistrophe

Photo By: Carrie

Clam Beach, CA
You Me We:

You generate natural awe and inspiration
You easily over take my worried heart
You have my essence when in your presence

You are wind, roots, waves, caves, I feel
You settle down when I dig
You slip into the moist ground

You are listening, carefully
You are curious if I am here to give
You wonder will I take more than I should

You want to believe in me
You give so much in blissful views, sunsets, rivers, mountains too
You crumble making way for new, endlessly

You are finely tuned
You carry an ever-changing load
You continue the ride around the sun tilting

You are just enough to keep everything balanced, I know
You are secretly wounded
You feel deep-rooted pain

You wonder when we will notice this is not a game
You are warning us it is clear at least to me
You are aging faster than anyone wants to actually believe

You need to know, my heroine, my home
You are my Mother Earth
You are not alone

**Today’s writing 201 assignment prompt is to write about your hero or heroine, I chose Mother Nature because she is my greatest heroine. We are encouraged to write a poem in ballad form, “Ballads are dramatic, emotionally charged poems that tell a story, often about bigger-than-life characters and situations. They can be long, short, rhymed, or unrhymed β€” by now there are no strict rules β€” though it’s still common for ballads to have a refrain.” I am not sure I did it…there were few rules given for me to know if I was on the right track. Today’s device is either anaphora or epistrophe, which are wild looking words that mean “Anaphora simply means the repetition of the same word (or cluster of words) at the beginning of multiple lines of verse in the same poem. Epistrophe is its counterpart: the repeated words appear at the end of lines. Like most simple devices, though, the trick is in deploying them to their full effect.”

Hopefully by the end of my poem YOU have the feeling it is up to YOU to see Mother Nature for what she is, does and needs. I would love to hear your feedback and thoughts on ballad poetry. This was a challenging prompt, but fun to get creative and deep.

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10 comments

  1. I don’t know anything about ballad poetry but I enjoyed reading this, Carrie. Great choice of hero(ine). More people definitely need to see Mother Nature for what she is, does and needs!

    1. That is encouraging, Louise. I know nothing about ballad poetry either. Possibly I need a refrain in my poem…I felt okay to let it go, at this point πŸ™‚ Yes, mother nature, what a heroine, I loved thinking of her in this way while writing this.
      Happy to read you enjoyed the words, that is really what matters most to me, an emotion evoked by reading my words, what a thrill. Thank you!

    1. Aren’t they wild, Laura. This was from my birthday adventure to the beach…such a great blustery day. Looks like we are in for a few of those to end the week…Looking forward to seeing what I can capture on the edge of the storms πŸ™‚

  2. Carrie, I read this as a ballad imprinted by your personality and style, the sort of thing expert musicians do when playing jazz. It is beautiful and about a most wondrous heroine. A pretty spectacular failure.

    1. Well…I am so happy you enjoyed it, thank you so much for your kind support. These prompts are so challenging, when I finished writing this I felt like it was what I wanted to say. It was enough, even if it wasn’t what I thought a ballad should “sound” like. And, in the end, that is really the point of this challenge for me. To write, poetry, everyday in ways I wouldn’t have otherwise done. Only a couple days left, We are on the downhill slide!

    1. Thank you, Cybele for such kind words and support. I really appreciate it. It was so lovely to think of the wondrous Mother Earth as a heroine. She was fully present when I took the image, on my 40th birthday whipping wild winds, on the verge of rain shaking me awake πŸ™‚

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